Our History

A unique environment rich in history

Great importance in the history of the paper industry was the creation, in 1798, of the "continuous machine", designed by Louis-Nicolas Robert, employee of the paper mill owned by the Parisian printers Didot-Sant-Léger of which Carlo Lefebvre, business partner, financed the design.
With the "continuous machine" or "sans-fin" the transition from the artisan production of paper (sheet by sheet) to the industrial one was realized, a fact that paved the way for the great diffusion of the book, periodical press and newspapers, events determined by the development of the great nineteenth-century revolutions.
In our areas, as Anna Dell'Orefice recalls, Lefebvre installed the first example in Carnello in 1833.
The installation of this machine required strong economic investments to the point that, since 1826, the industrialist had asked the Bourbon government for the exclusive import of the machine and the exemption from payment of customs duties also for the cylinders and the necessary accessories, made of iron, copper, lead and wood.
About six years later (1839), Carlo Lefebvre himself inserted a second paper machine in Isola del Liri, in the Fibreno paper mill.
The former Cartiera del Fibreno, founded in 1812 by Carlo Antonio Betanger, used the premises of the Carmelite convent and an adjoining deconsecrated church entitled to Santa Maria delle Forme. The factory was subsequently purchased in 1822 by Carlo Lefebvre who was then succeeded in 1858 by his son Ernesto and, therefore, by his nephew Francesco in 1888.
In 1892, he rented the Cartiera del Fibreno, which now extended over an area of ​​23,000 square meters, first to Gabriele De Caria and then to the Southern Paper Mills Society which then bought it in 1907.
For lovers of the subject and lovers of local history, the paper mill still retains the nineteenth-century charm of the primitive industrial site, through a skilful restoration linked to the new reuse aimed at relaxation and catering.
The almost fortuitous conservation of ancient departments and machinery, left right where they were originally placed, allows you to relive the environments of a paper mill at the dawn of the industrial revolution in Alta Terra di Lavoro; along the banks of the Liri and Fibreno rivers by the entrepreneurial bourgeoisie of Northern Europe and France in particular, which came to Italy following the Napoleonic troops.
The portion of the territory of the town of Isola del Liri where these new factories arose and where the owners built their luxurious residences, surrounded by fountains and lush tall trees, as well as the natural beauty of the places, was called the Little Paris, for the enormous fascination and amazement aroused in the visitors of that time: kings, nobles, writers, artists and poets from all over the world for the atmosphere that lived in those places.

Bruno Ceroli


A unique environment rich in history

Great importance in the history of the paper industry was the creation, in 1798, of the "continuous machine", designed by Louis-Nicolas Robert, employee of the paper mill owned by the Parisian printers Didot-Sant-Léger of which Carlo Lefebvre, business partner, financed the design.
With the "continuous machine" or "sans-fin" the transition from the artisan production of paper (sheet by sheet) to the industrial one was realized, a fact that paved the way for the great diffusion of the book, periodical press and newspapers, events determined by the development of the great nineteenth-century revolutions.
In our areas, as Anna Dell'Orefice recalls, Lefebvre installed the first example in Carnello in 1833.
The installation of this machine required strong economic investments to the point that, since 1826, the industrialist had asked the Bourbon government for the exclusive import of the machine and the exemption from payment of customs duties also for the cylinders and the necessary accessories, made of iron, copper, lead and wood.
About six years later (1839), Carlo Lefebvre himself inserted a second paper machine in Isola del Liri, in the Fibreno paper mill.
The former Cartiera del Fibreno, founded in 1812 by Carlo Antonio Betanger, used the premises of the Carmelite convent and an adjoining deconsecrated church entitled to Santa Maria delle Forme. The factory was subsequently purchased in 1822 by Carlo Lefebvre who was then succeeded in 1858 by his son Ernesto and, therefore, by his nephew Francesco in 1888.
In 1892, he rented the Cartiera del Fibreno, which now extended over an area of ​​23,000 square meters, first to Gabriele De Caria and then to the Southern Paper Mills Society which then bought it in 1907.
For lovers of the subject and lovers of local history, the paper mill still retains the nineteenth-century charm of the primitive industrial site, through a skilful restoration linked to the new reuse aimed at relaxation and catering.
The almost fortuitous conservation of ancient departments and machinery, left right where they were originally placed, allows you to relive the environments of a paper mill at the dawn of the industrial revolution in Alta Terra di Lavoro; along the banks of the Liri and Fibreno rivers by the entrepreneurial bourgeoisie of Northern Europe and France in particular, which came to Italy following the Napoleonic troops.
The portion of the territory of the town of Isola del Liri where these new factories arose and where the owners built their luxurious residences, surrounded by fountains and lush tall trees, as well as the natural beauty of the places, was called the Little Paris, for the enormous fascination and amazement aroused in the visitors of that time: kings, nobles, writers, artists and poets from all over the world for the atmosphere that lived in those places.

Bruno Ceroli